Posts Tagged ‘species loss’

Hey, Center for Biodiversity, Listen Up!

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Source:  NIPCC

For those serious about science and species, book and reviews here: http://www.amazon.com/CO2-Global-Warming-Species-Extinctions/dp/0981969402/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1327547485&sr=8-4

[SPPI Note: Likely one of the most notoriously unscientific groups is the Center for Biodiversity, which files reams of listings for species endangerment based on deeply flawed models, statistical manipulations and bald ignorance of the broader sciences. A multititute of papers in the literature attest to this:

Biodiversity

Summary
Among Genotypes
C3 Plants vs. C4 Plants
Fungi
General
Grasslands
Marine Species
N-Fixers vs. Non-N-Fixers
Weeds vs. Non-Weeds

A complete review of the literature can be found here.

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Recent paper# 1

Reference
Sears, M.W., Raskin, E. and Angilletta Jr., M.J. 2011. The world is not flat: Defining relevant thermal landscapes in the context of climate change. Integrative and Comparative Biology 51: 666-675.

Climate alarmists have historically predicted catastrophic species extinctions based on the presumption that CO2-induced global warming will be so fast and furious that many species of plants and animals will not be able to migrate either poleward in latitude or upward in altitude rapidly enough to remain within the “climate envelope” to which they are accustomed. (more…)

Animal armageddon: “they compete, they parasitize each other and they eat each other”

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

 Source: http://newnostradamusofthenorth.blogspot.com/2012/01/animal-armageddon-they-compete-they.html

Global warming scaremonglers are becoming more and more desperate. The latest scare comes from University of Connecticut warmists who have invented some ”really sophisticated” models for predicting the coming of animal armageddon:
“We have really sophisticated meteorological models for predicting climate change,” said University of Connecticut ecologist Mark Urban, who led the study. “But in real life, animals move around, they compete, they parasitize each other and they eat each other. The majority of our predictions don’t include these important interactions.”

The study finds that animals unable to regulate their own temperature are likely move to different climates, possibly increasing the number invasive species. The team discovered that animals are traveling an average of eleven miles per decade towards our planets poles, likely in an effort to escape increasingly warm temperatures. Among the more extreme examples included one butterfly species that has already moved over 130 miles north in just two decades.
Not all species can disperse fast enough to get to these more suitable places before they die off, Mr. Urban said. And if they do make it to these better habitats, they may be outcompeted by the species that are already there – or the ones that got there first, said the study’s authors.

Read the entire story here

How tragic all this is, when we know that animals lived in peaceful harmony with each other before man-made global warming made them cruel cannibals!

Great stuff for a new Hollywood horror blockbuster!

No Decline in Polar Bear Population

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Source: CNS

Mother polar bear with cub. (Photo by Scott Schliebe of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

The Polar Bear Specialist Group of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the organization of scientists that has attempted to monitor the global polar bear population since the 1960s, has issued a report indicating that there was no change in the overall global polar bear population in the most recent four-year period studied.

“The total number of polar bears is still thought to be between 20,000 and 25,000,” the group said in a press release published together with a report on the proceedings of its 15th meeting

20,000 to 25,000 polar bears worldwide is exactly the same population estimate the group made following its 14th international meeting.

“The total number of polar bears worldwide is estimated to be 20,000–25,000,” the scientists said in the report they issued after that previous meeting. (more…)

Species extinction: The teflon doomsayers

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Source:  Stephen Budiansky

In The Rational Optimist, Matt Ridley offers example after spectacular example of a phenomenon that has baffled me ever since I began covering environmental issues in my first job in journalism thirty years ago: to wit, that while the entire presumable goal, purpose, and raison d’être of applied environmental science is to solve environmental problems, any environmental scientist who dares to suggest that problems are being solved is asking for trouble. As Ridley observes, we have arrived at a state where even the most wildly irrational pessimism is treated with reverence, while the most cautiously sober optimism is ridiculed.

SPPI NOTE: see these books for more on the topics of species endangerment

Some of this is human nature and was ever thus; intellectuals, as The Rational Optimist reminds us, have been decrying modernism ever since modernism began. Actually, I wouldn’t stop there: the belief in a lost golden age is as old as civilization, as is the intellectual vanity of casting oneself as the lone uncorrupted voice in the wilderness. A few thousand years before Dostoevsky, Malthus, George Orwell, andThe Rational Optimist, the Hebrew prophets were pouring out gloom and dismay with the best of them, dismissing the superficial comforts of the civilized world and its material rewards as a fool’s paradise. Pessimism is what people with deep minds and deep souls have; optimism is what idiots with vacant grins on their faces have. (more…)

Where Are The Corpses?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Source:  Wattsup

by Willis Eschenbach

Abstract

The record of continental (as opposed to island) bird and mammal extinctions in the last five centuries was analyzed to determine if the “species-area” relationship actually works to predict extinctions. Very few continental birds or mammals are recorded as having gone extinct, and none have gone extinct from habitat reduction alone. No continental forest bird or mammal is recorded as having gone extinct from any cause. Since the species-area relationship predicts that there should have been a very large number of recorded bird and mammal extinctions from habitat reduction over the last half millennium, I show that the species-area relationship gives erroneous answers to the question of extinction rates.

Figure 1. The Object of My Quest — The Corpse of an Extinct Bird

Book Review – HEATSTROKE: NATURE IN AN AGE OF GLOBAL WARMING

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

Source:  Journal Bioscience, vol. 60, 552-553

REVIEW OF HEATSTROKE: NATURE IN AN AGE OF GLOBAL WARMING by Anthony D. Barnosky, 2009 (Washington, DC: Island Press) 269pp.

By Daniel B. Botkin

[Dr. Botkin in not associated with SPPI.]

In the late 1960s I began studying possible ecological effects of global warming, and  first published a paper about these possibilities in 1973.  Thus, I have watched with surprise, and sometimes dismay, the sudden development of scientific and public concern over this issue.  When I first began to explore the mechanisms by which a trace gas such as CO2 could influence our planet’s climate, getting into the then abstruse topics of atmospheric physical chemistry and energy exchange, there were just a few scientists — mainly climatologists, meteorologists, and ecologists —  who even knew about the possibility, and even fewer who were doing scientific research on it.

It was a time when not many were aware that life of any kind could affect the environment at a planetary level, but several of us were exploring those possibilities.  I was fortunate to be one of the first to help NASA begin using satellite remote sensing to study a planetary perspective on life.  I also worked with scientists at IBM to develop one of the first computer models that could be used to forecast possible effects of climate change on any kind of ecological system.  It seemed at that time, through the 1970s into the early 1980s,  an uphill battle to even get a large number of scientists to believe in such possibilities, let alone the public. (more…)

Vegetative Response to Climate Change: Celebrate, Don’t Fret

Monday, June 21st, 2010

SPPI Note:  The Gonzales paper speculations do not fit real world observations and data.  See the following:

http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/originals/plant_and_animal_response.html

http://www.amazon.com/CO2-Global-Warming-Species-Extinctions/dp/0981969402/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277150227&sr=1-1

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Source: Master Resource

by Chip Knappenberger
June 21, 2010

A new study has concluded that shifting climate is leading to shifting vegetation patterns across the globe.

My response to this announcement was “Terrific! The biosphere was responding the way it should to changing conditions.”

To my surprise, this enthusiasm wasn’t shared by the study’s authors. In fact, lead author Patrick Gonzalez seemed downright glum:

“Globally, vegetation shifts are disrupting ecosystems, reducing habitat for endangered species, and altering the forests that supply water and other services to many people.”

A very negative spin on what should be cause for celebration. (more…)

The Demise of the Monteverde Golden Toad

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

Source:  CO2 Science

Reference
Anchukaitis, K.J. and Evans, M.N. 2010. Tropical cloud forest climate variability and the demise of the Monteverde golden toad. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 107: 5036-5040.

Background
The authors write that “widespread amphibian extinctions in the mountains of the American tropics have been blamed on the interaction of anthropogenic climate change and a lethal pathogen,” as we have discussed at length in reviews of papers we have archived under the heading of Extinction (Real-World Observations — Animals: Amphibians) in our Subject Index; and they note, in this regard, that “limited meteorological records make it difficult to conclude whether current climate conditions at these sites are actually exceptional in the context of natural variability,” questioning once again the original climate-alarmist contention that modern global warming was the primary culprit in the demise of the Monteverde golden toad (Bufo periglenes). (more…)

TEEB report has multiple errors in first chapter alone, Parts #1 & 2

Monday, June 14th, 2010

Source: Climate Quotes

Source: #2 Climate Quotes

It’s been quiet here for over a month. This has been a busy time for me, I am now a college graduate (and looking for a job, know of any?). I intend to continue posting however, and when I saw a headline article on climate depot a while ago I dug a little deeper into the story.

This article from the Guardian talks about new UN biodiversity report. It’s worth reading. Here is an interesting quote:

The report will advocate massive changes to the way the global economy is run so that it factors in the value of the natural world. In future, it says, communities should be paid for conserving nature rather than using it; companies given stricter limits on what they can take from the environment and fined or taxed more to limit over-exploitation; subsidies worth more than US$1tn (£696.5bn) a year for industries like agriculture, fisheries, energy and transport reformed; and businesses and national governments asked to publish accounts for their use of natural and human capital alongside their financial results.

Shock! The UN is using protection of the natural world as a reason to make massive changes to the global economy? This sounds familiar, which I’m sure is why Morano posted it. Whenever the UN puts out a report that involves the world spending a lot of money, I get suspicious, so I decided to take a look at the interim report (the final isn’t going to be published until later this year). Here is the report. (more…)

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