Posts Tagged ‘Sea ice’

Time To Hold Environmental And Climate Doomsayers To Account

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Source:  Canada Free Press

by Dr. Tim Ball

The 1990 Greenpeace Report on Global Warming said, carbon dioxide is added to the atmosphere naturally and unnaturally. They define unnatural as anything humans do. It is part of the theme of environmentalism that humans shouldn’t be here or tolerated only if they behave as they are told. The other part of the idea of unnatural is exploited to keep the people enthralled, fearful and therefore controlled. H.L.Mencken’s comment that, “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary” applies and is proof of the political nature of events presented, directly or with implication, as unnatural.

The false idea is presented out of context then left uncorrected by lack of follow up. This is especially true if the story is a prediction. We need a media vehicle to analyze the story in context followed by the aftermath. It’s time for a program on which doomsayers who profited financially or politically from false stories and predictions confronted and held to account. Here are some recent stories that proved incorrect. (more…)

Royal Society issues new climate change guide that admits there are ‘uncertainties’

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

Source:  UK Daily Mail

By Niall Firth, UK Daily Mail

The UK’s leading scientific body has been forced to rewrite its guide on climate change and admit that it is not known how much warmer the Earth will become.

The Royal Society has updated its guide after 43 of its members complained that the previous version failed to take into account the opinion of climate change sceptics.

Now the new guide, called ‘Climate change: a summary of the science’, admits that there are some ‘uncertainties’ regarding the science behind climate change. And it says that it impossible to know for sure how the Earth’s climate will change in the future nor what the possible effects may be.

The 19-page guide says: ‘It is not possible to determine exactly how much the Earth will warm or exactly how the climate will change in the future, but careful estimates of potential changes and associated uncertainties have been made. Scientists continue to work to narrow these areas of uncertainty. Uncertainty can work both ways, since the changes and their impacts may be either smaller or larger than those projected.’ (more…)

Brrrr… Climate Scientists Say Mini Ice Age Likely For 20-30 Years

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010
by Jim Hoft
Source:  http://gatewaypundit.firstthings.com/2010/01/brrrr-climate-scientists-say-mini-ice-age-likely-for-20-30-years/

Great Britain suffered through its worst winter snow storm in 40 years this past week.

This image of the UK taken from NASA’s multi-national Terra satellite on Thursday shows the extent of the freezing weather. (Daily Mail)

Climate scientists warned this week that a mini ice age is likely to last for the next 20 to 30 years.
The Daily Mail reported:

The bitter winter afflicting much of the Northern Hemisphere is only the start of a global trend towards cooler weather that is likely to last for 20 or 30 years, say some of the world’s most eminent climate scientists. (more…)

Melt? Schmelt. Sailing the Northwest Passage in the 1940s

Sunday, December 13th, 2009

We are often told that the occasional opening of the North-West Passage in the Arctic is an indication of “global warming”, when in fact all it indicates is the well-known volatility of the Arctic climate.

Amundsen sailed through the North-West Passage in a sailing vessel in 1903. A reader has kindly sent us the following account of a Canadian supply-ship that sailed the North-West Passage in the 1940s.

The Arctic vessel St. Roch, built for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Force to serve as a supply ship for isolated, far-flung Arctic detachments, was also designed to serve when frozen-in for the winter as a floating detachment with its constables mounting dog sled patrols from the ship. Between 1929 and 1939, St. Roch made three voyages to the Arctic.

Between 1940 and 1942, St. Roch navigated the Northwest Passage, arriving in Halifax harbor on October 11, 1942. St. Roch was the second ship to make the passage, and the first to travel the passage from west to east. In 1944, St. Roch returned to Vancouver via the more northerly route of the Northwest Passage, making her run in 86 days.

The epic voyages of St. Roch demonstrated Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic during the difficult wartime years, and extended Canadian control over her vast northern territories.