Posts Tagged ‘Idso’

June 2014 Archive of Scientific Literature Reviews

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Source:  NIPCC
redwood trees

http://www.nipccreport.org/issues/2014/jun.html

Old Trees: The Bigger They Are, The More Carbon They Sequester (3 Jun 2014)
New data overturn an old concept, revealing that “rapid growth in giant trees is the global norm” and “it appears to hold regardless of competitive environment”… Read More (more…)

Dialing Back the Alarm on Climate Change

Saturday, September 14th, 2013

Source: WSJ

A forthcoming report points lowers estimates on global warmingco2_and_earths_future

By MATT RIDLEY

Later this month, a long-awaited event that last happened in 2007 will recur. Like a returning comet, it will be taken to portend ominous happenings. I refer to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) “fifth assessment report,” part of which will be published on Sept. 27.

There have already been leaks from this 31-page document, which summarizes 1,914 pages of scientific discussion, but thanks to a senior climate scientist, I have had a glimpse of the key prediction at the heart of the document. The big news is that, for the first time since these reports started coming out in 1990, the new one dials back the alarm. It states that the temperature rise we can expect as a result of man-made emissions of carbon dioxide is lower than the IPPC thought in 2007.

Admittedly, the change is small, and because of changing definitions, it is not easy to compare the two reports, but retreat it is. It is significant because it points to the very real possibility that, over the next several generations, the overall effect of climate change will be positive for humankind and the planet. (more…)

New SPPI Paper: Solar Influence on Global Temperature

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Source: SPPIIdso - solar_influence

The claim that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions have been responsible for the warming detected in the twentieth century is based on what Loehle (2004)[1] calls “the standard assumption in climate research, including the IPCC reports,” that “over a century time interval there is not likely to be any recognizable trend to global temperatures (Risbey et al., 2000), and thus the null model for climate signal detection is a flat temperature trend with some autocorrelated noise,” so that “any warming trends in excess of that expected from normal climatic variability are then assumed to be due to anthropogenic effects.” If, however, there are significant underlying climate trends or cycles-or both-either known or unknown, that assumption is clearly invalid.

Historical Trends of African Glacier Dynamics

Friday, September 7th, 2012

Source: SPPI

Kilimanjaro, the highest free-standing mountain in the world, was long renowned for its summit glaciers, immortalized by Ernest Hemingway in his famous short story “The Snows of Kilimanjaro.” Over the first few years of the current century, its disappearing summit ice fields were once again made famous, this time by political luminaries such as Al Gore, Hillary Clinton and John McCain, who cited them as unmistakable evidence of the deleterious consequences of human-induced global warming.

On the floor of the U.S. Senate during debate on Senate Bill 139 back in 2004, for example, Arizona Senator John McCain called this attribution not only a fact, but a fact “that cannot be refuted by any scientist.”

Then in subsequent debate on the same bill, former New York Senator Hillary Clinton echoed Senator McCain’s sentiments. Displaying a set of photos taken from the same vantage point in 1970 and 1999 – the first depicting “a 20-foot-high glacier” and the second “only a trace of ice” – she said that in those pictures “we have evidence in the most dramatic way possible of the effects of 29 years of global warming.”

Nevertheless, and in spite of the absolute certitude with which the two senators expressed their views on the subject – which allowed for no “wiggle room” whatsoever – scientific analyses have shown both of them to be as wrong as they could possibly be.

 

Earth’s Thermal Sensitivity to a Doubling of Atmospheric CO2

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

Source: CCR

Reference
Lindzen, R.S. and Choi, Y.-S. 2009. On the determination of climate feedbacks from ERBE data. Geophysical Research Letters 36: 10.1029/2009GL039628.

What change in the mean surface air temperature of the planet would be caused by a doubling of the air’s CO2 content? In the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report, the most likely range for this thermal sensitivity parameter, as determined by numerous climate models, is something in the range of 2 to 4.5°C; yet even this significant degree of warming has been suggested by many of the world’s climate alarmists to be too small. And as a result, a great hue and cry has been raised by folks such as Al Gore, who is hard at work attempting to convince everyone that they have a moral responsibility to “save the planet” by demanding legislative actions designed to drastically reduce anthropogenic CO2emissions. (more…)

Landfast Sea Ice Extent Along the East Antarctic Coast (12 June 2012)

Friday, June 15th, 2012

Source:  CCR

Reference
Fraser, A.D., Massom, R.A., Michael, K.J., Galton-Fenzi, B.K. and Lieser, J.L. 2012. East Antarctic landfast sea ice distribution and variability, 2000-08. Journal of Climate 25: 1137-1156.

In the words of Frazer et al. (2012), “landfast sea ice (fast ice) is sea ice that is held stationary (fast) by being attached to coastal features (e.g., the shoreline, glacier tongues, and ice shelves), grounded icebergs, or grounded over shoals,” and that “it is a preeminent feature of the Antarctic coastal zone and an important interface between the ice sheet and pack ice/ocean.” They also state that variability in fast ice extent “is likely a sensitive indicator of climate change,” citing Murphy et al. (1995), Heil et al. (2006) and Mahoney et al. (2007); but they indicate that “despite the physical significance of fast ice, it is currently not represented in global climate circulation models or coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere models.” (more…)

Amazonian Plant Extinctions

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Source:  Climate Change Reconsidered

Reference
Feeley, K.J. and Silman, M.R. 2009. Extinction risks of Amazonian plant species. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 106: 12,382-12,387.

Writing in the pages of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Feeley and Silman (2009) say that “ongoing development of the Amazon, including natural gas and oil production, large-scale cattle ranching, soy farming, extended networks of improved roads, and the various synergistic activities that invariably accompany increased access, is causing the rapid loss and degradation of natural habitat,” which, as we all know, can lead to the extinctions of species that live there.

So just how serious is the situation? (more…)

The Current Warm Period: Natural or Not?

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Source:  Climate Change Reconsidered

Reference
Humlum, O., Solheim, J.-E. and Stordahl, K. 2011. Identifying natural contributions to late Holocene climate change. Global and Planetary Change 79: 145-156.

Authors Humlum et al. (2011) write that “analytic climate models have provided the means to predict potential impacts on future climate by anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition.” However, they indicate that “future climate development will not only be influenced by anthropogenic changes, but also by natural variations.” And they say that knowledge of these variations is incomplete. (more…)

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Source: Climate Change Reconsidered

Reference
Bali, R., Agarwal, K.K., Ali, S.N. and Srivastava, P. 2011. Is the recessional pattern of Himalayan glaciers suggestive of anthropogenically induced global warming? Arabian Journal of Geosciences 4: 1087-1093.

Bali et al. (2011) introduce their review of what is known about Himalayan glaciers by noting that a “glacial inventory carried out by the Geological Survey of India reveals the existence of over 9,000 valley glaciers in India and at least about 2,000 glaciers in Nepal and Bhutan,” citing Raina (2006). And they say that “following the alarmist approach of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC),” a number of subsequent reports related to the bleak future of Himalayan glaciers have been issued, mainly through the media. These reports, as they describe them, have suggested that “almost all Indian glaciers including the Gangotri glacier will vanish from the Earth in the next few decades.” More particularly, they say the reports suggest that “initially, there would be flooding followed by the drying of glacial fed rivers of the Indian subcontinent, desertification, rise of sea level, submergence of the coastal areas, spread of diseases, drop in the production of food grains, etc.,” all due, of course, to “anthropogenically induced global warming.”

So what’s the real story? (more…)

US Water-year Runoff

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Source:  Climate Change Reconsidered

Reference
McCabe, G.J. and Wolock, D.M. 2011. Independent effects of temperature and precipitation on modeled runoff in the conterminous United States. Water Resources Research 47: 10.1029/2011WR010630.

Authors McCabe and Wolock (2011) write that “effects of global warming on streamflow magnitude are of particular concern given that these effects directly alter water supplies.” In this regard, however, they say that “previous studies of trends and variability of streamflow in the United States primarily have focused on the latter half of the 20th century,” noting that these trends “may not be representative of longer time periods.” Thus, they decided to significantly increase the time domain of their new study of the subject to cover the period 1900-2008, stating that it would “be informative to evaluate temporal patterns in streamflow over the longest possible period,” which is critically important, in light of the fact that Earth’s recovery from the global chill of the Little Ice Age began well over a century ago. (more…)

China: Climate issues NOT settled

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Source:  CO2 Science

 

Global Warming: The View from China

“Global climate change,” in the words of Fang et al. (2011), “is one of the biggest challenges to human society in the 21st century.” And noting that “carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and land use change are considered the main factors causing global warming,” plus the fact that “carbon emissions affect social and economic development,” they correctly state that “climate change has been shifted from an academic topic to an international political, economic, and diplomatic issue.” (more…)

Modeling the Pattern of Tropical Ocean Warming

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Source:  CO2 Science

Reference
Shin, S.-I. and Sardeshmukh, P.D. 2011. Critical influence of the pattern of Tropical Ocean warming on remote climate trends. Climate Dynamics 36: 1577-1591.

What was done
In exploring this subject further, Shin and Sardeshmukh compared multi-model ensemble simulations of the last half-century with corresponding observations, focusing on the world’s tropical oceans, as well as the land masses surrounding the North Atlantic Ocean, including North America, Greenland, Europe, and North Africa. This was done, as they describe it, using “all available coupled [atmosphere-ocean] model simulations of the period 1951-1999 from 18 international modeling centers, generated as part of the IPCC’s 20th century climate simulations with prescribed time-varying radiative forcings associated with greenhouse gases, aerosols, and solar variations.” (more…)

55 Positive Externalities: Hail to Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Source:  Master Resource

by Chip Knappenberger

In my last post, I suggested that the externalities from coal-fired electricity generation were probably not as negative as was being touted in a recent report by Paul Epstein and colleagues from the Center for Health and the Global Environment. As further support for my contention, I submit the contents of a new book by copious carbon dioxide researchers Drs. Sherwood and Craig Idso titled “The Many Benefits of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment: How humanity and the rest of the biosphere will prosper from this amazing trace gas that so many have wrongfully characterized as a dangerous air pollutant!” (more…)

The Depths to Which Some Roots Will Go

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Source:  CO2 Science

Reference
Iversen, C.M. 2010. Digging deeper: Fine-root responses to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration in forested ecosystems. New Phytologist 186: 346-357.

What was done
Colleen Iversen of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) reviewed the pertinent scientific literature “to examine the potential mechanisms for, and consequences of, deeper rooting distributions under elevated CO2 as they relate to ecosystem carbon and nitrogen cycling,” focusing primarily on forests. (more…)

Ocean Acidification (Effects on Marine Plants: Phytoplankton, Foraminifera) — Summary

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Source:  CO2 Science

Foraminifera are amoeboid protists with reticulating pseudopods, i.e., fine strands of cytoplasm that subdivide into branches that merge to form a dynamic network. They are typically less than one mm in size (but can be much larger), and they produce an elaborate calcium carbonate shell called a test, which may have one or more chambers. As for their impact on the undersea marine environment, these widespread calcifying protozoa, acording to Schiebel (2002), are responsible for 32-80% of the global deep-ocean flux of calcite. Therefore, it is important to determine the degree to which various forams — as they are often called — may or may not be harmed by likely future increases in what has come to be known as ocean acidification. (more…)