Posts Tagged ‘Hurricane science’

Climate Better than ‘We’ Thought

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

Source:  National Journal  global_warming_hoax

By Marlo Lewis

The pro-Obama group Organizing for Action last week launched a campaign to “call out” climate change deniers in Congress. They’re trying to restart the debate by mobilizing people to tweet their congressman with messages like: “Rep. [X] Stop denying the science of climate change. It’s time for Congress to act.” This tactic is unlikely to prove any more successful than the previous 20 years of scaremongering, vilification, and hype.

We won’t have productive conversations in Congress about climate policy until the pro-“action” (i.e. pro-tax, pro-regulation) side starts acknowledging some basic realities: (more…)

Hurricane Record in Florida Sink Hole

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Source: NIPCC

See also this SPPI Paper

Reference
Lane, P., Donnelly, J.P., Woodruff, J.D. and Hawkes, A.D. 2011. A decadally-resolved paleohurricane record archived in the late Holocene sediments of a Florida sinkhole. Marine Geology 287: 14-30.

Noting that “the brief observational record is inadequate for characterizing natural variability in hurricane activity occurring on longer than multi-decadal timescales,” Lane et al. (2011) sought a means of characterizing hurricane activity prior to the period of modern measurement and historical record keeping, due to the fact that “the manner in which tropical cyclone activity and climate interact has critical implications for society and is not well understood.”

 

[SPPI Note:  see new SPPI paper here:

http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/originals/eye_of_the_storm.html ]

Specifically, Lane et al. developed a 4500-year record of intense hurricane-induced storm surges based on data obtained from “a nearly circular, 200-m-diameter cover-collapse sinkhole (Mullet Pond: 29°55.520′N, 84°20.275′W) that is located on Bald Point near Apalachee Bay, Florida, USA, where (1) “recent deposition of sand layers in the upper sediments of the pond was found to be contemporaneous with significant, historic storm surges at the site modeled using SLOSH and the Best Track, post-1851 AD dataset,” where (2) “paleohurricane deposits were identified by sand content and dated using radiocarbon-based age models,” and where (3) “marine-indicative foraminifera, some originating at least 5 km offshore, were present in several modern and ancient storm deposits.” (more…)

Updated WMO Consensus Perspective on Tropical Cyclones

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Source: Roger Pielke, Jr. Blog

A team of researchers under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization has published a new review paper in Nature Geoscience (PDF) updating consensus perspectives published in 1998 and 2006. The author team includes prominent scientists from either side of the “hurricane wars” of 2005-2006: Thomas R. Knutson, John L. McBride, Johnny Chan, Kerry Emanuel, Greg Holland, Chris Landsea, Isaac Held, James P. Kossin, A. K. Srivastava and Masato Sugi. (more…)

Dr. Chris Landsea Leaves the IPCC

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

by Robert Ferguson

We are often asked for references to the open letter Dr. Chris Landsea released outlining his reasons for withdrawing from the IPCC process.  It is posted below.

This is an open letter to the community from Chris Landsea.

January 17, 2005

Dear colleagues,

After some prolonged deliberation, I have decided to withdraw from participating in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). I am withdrawing because I have come to view the part of the IPCC to which my expertise is relevant as having become politicized. In addition, when I have raised my concerns to the IPCC leadership, their response was simply to dismiss my concerns.

With this open letter to the community, I wish to explain the basis for my decision and bring awareness to what I view as a problem in the IPCC process. The IPCC is a group of climate researchers from around the world that every few years summarize how climate is changing and how it may be altered in the future due to manmade global warming. I had served both as an author for the Observations chapter and a Reviewer for the 2nd Assessment Report in 1995 and the 3rd Assessment Report in 2001, primarily on the topic of tropical cyclones (hurricanes and typhoons). My work on hurricanes, and tropical cyclones more generally, has been widely cited by the IPCC. For the upcoming AR4, I was asked several weeks ago by the Observations chapter Lead Author – Dr. Kevin Trenberth – to provide the writeup for Atlantic hurricanes. As I had in the past, I agreed to assist the IPCC in what I thought was to be an important, and politically-neutral determination of what is happening with our climate. (more…)

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