Posts Tagged ‘Hockeystick graph’

Michael Mann — the ghost of climate past

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Following is a series of articles updating the Mann Hockey Stick fiasco, with sources provided per each post.

Michael Mann

Source: PJ Media

People who have been following the climate debate closely know that one of the most controversial and key elements of the controversy is the so-called “hockey stick” — a graph of supposed global temperature over the past centuries that ostensibly shows a dramatic increase in average temperature in the last century or so (the upward swoop of the graph at that point is the business end of the stick, with regard to the puck). It vaulted its inventor, Michael Mann of Penn State University, to climate stardom, with associated acclaim and government grants, when he first presented it in the late ’90s. It was the visual basis of much of the hysteria in recent years, from Al Gore’s Oscar-winning crockumentary to bogus reports from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Unfortunately for those promoting the theory (and the potentially economically catastrophic policy recommendations supposedly supported by it), recent events indicate that the last basis of scientific support for the hockey stick may be crumbling. But to understand this, a little background is necessary. (more…)

The scientific finding that does not settle the climate-change debate

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

By S. Fred Singer     

Letter to WashPost  Oct 25, 2011**

Before you write off Bachmann, Cain, and Perry as cynical diehards, deniers, idiots, or whatever, [WashPost Oct 24] consider this:

Why are you surprised by the results of the Berkeley Climate Project?  They used data from the same weather stations as the Climategate people, but reported that one-third showed cooling — not warming.

They covered the same land area – less than 30% of the Earth’s surface – with recording stations that are poorly distributed, mainly in US and Western Europe.  They state that 70% of US stations are badly sited and don’t meet the standards set by government; the rest of the world is likely worse. (more…)