New SPPI Paper: Modern Growth Trends of Forests

Source:  SPPIIdso forests

How well have earth’s forests been faring during the modern era? This question was asked a few years ago by five researchers (Lapenis et al., 2005[1]), who sought the answer by analyzing trends in forest biomass in all 28 ecoregions covering the Russian territory, based on data collected from 1953 to 2002 within 3196 sample plots comprised of about 50,000 entries, which database, in their words, “contains all available archived and published data.” And in doing so, they discovered that over the period 1961-1998, “aboveground wood, roots, and green parts increased by 4%, 21%, and 33%, respectively,” such that “the total carbon density of the living biomass stock of the Russian forests increased by ~9% from 4.08 to 4.44 kg C m-2.” In addition, they report there was an “increase in the area of the Russian forests (from 695.5 x 1010 m2 in 1961 to 774.2 x 1010 m2 in 1998),” which equates to an increase of about 11%