India Has Big Plans for Burning Coal

Source: Scientific American

BIG COAL: India has big plans for burning coal, with attendant impacts on global warming Image: flickr/conskeptical

India Has Big Plans for Burning Coal: Scientific American

India is poised to contend with China as the globe’s top consumer of coal, with 455 power plants preparing to come online, a prominent environmental research group has concluded.

The coal plants in India’s pipeline — almost 100 more than China is preparing to build — would deliver 519,396 megawatts of installed generating capacity. That is only slightly less than pending new capacity in China, which remains the undisputed king of coal consumption.

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India is poised to contend with China as the globe’s top consumer of coal, with 455 power plants preparing to come online, a prominent environmental research group has concluded.

The coal plants in India’s pipeline — almost 100 more than China is preparing to build — would deliver 519,396 megawatts of installed generating capacity. That is only slightly less than pending new capacity in China, which remains the undisputed king of coal consumption.

The data from the World Resources Institute (WRI), not released publicly but obtained by ClimateWire, paint a picture of a global energy trajectory in which coal remains a dominant actor, despite concerns about rising costs and environmental groups’ trumpeting of the reduced costs of renewable energy.

The research found 1,231 new coal plants with a total installed capacity of more than 1.4 million MW proposed worldwide. Beyond the biggest users — China, India and the United States — the assessment finds a heavy coal demand building up in Russia, Vietnam, Turkey and South Africa. The United States, with 79 coal plants in the pipeline, ranks fourth in this category.

Environmentalists called the numbers alarming, but coal industry leaders said the plants are not enough to meet the world’s energy needs.

“We need more. We need more of everything — wind power, renewables, hydro. But we will certainly need more coal,” said Milton Catelin, CEO of the World Coal Association. He argued that with 1.5 billion people still living without access to electricity, coal needs to grow.

“It’s still the most affordable fuel by a long shot,” he said. “It’s going to be important where countries have a large poverty challenge and in particular a large energy poverty challenge, and where they have access to coal reserves.”

The WRI assessment appears to be the most exhaustive compilation to date of coal plants in the global pipeline, along with robust analyses of the export landscape and financing trend. Catelin, who said he had seen the estimates and found them accurate, said the industry association does not keep its own central data of global coal production plans.

Locking in the next generation of power plants?
Culled from government and corporate websites, commercially available websites, news reports and civil society initiatives, the data on each plant were then cross-checked with field knowledge, according to the assessment. They cover only pending plants, not those already under construction.

Environmental groups familiar with the assessment called India’s explosive development of new coal-fired capacity a concern but not a surprise. Many were shocked, though, at the high level of coal activity in countries with little domestic production capacity, like Turkey and Vietnam.

Justin Guay, a coal campaigner for the Sierra Club, argued that while coal is still riding the reputation of being a cheap and easy fuel source, “it’s just not true anymore.” He argued that rising taxes on coal exports and competing energy sources have changed the energy landscape dramatically. The coal industry, he maintained, knows the economics are shaky and is racing to get plants built and lock countries into decades of coal dependence.

“What they need are power plants, and once they’re built, countries are going to pay the costs regardless. What are you going to do once you’ve invested so much in power plants? You are forced to bear the costs,” Guay said.

According to the WRI analysis, more than 34,000 MW of coal capacity is slated to come online in Vietnam, 30,000 MW in Turkey, and 22,000 MW in South Africa.

China, which has been on a coal binge for the past 15 years, still has the largest pipeline in the world in terms of megawatts. The WRI assessment notes that China’s 12th five-year plan approved 16 giant coal-power bases, mainly in northern provinces and close to mining fields.

Full article here:  http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=india-has-big-plans-for-burning-coal&page=2

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