Hot Jets

Source: SPPIBogus

by Dennis Ambler

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/20/business/flying-climate-change.html?

“In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift.

As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence.

“We tend to ignore the atmosphere and just think that the plane is flying through empty space, but of course, it’s not,” said Paul D. Williams, a professor in the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading in Britain who studies climate change and its effect on aviation. “Airplanes do not fly through a vacuum.

The atmosphere is being modified by climate change.”

This is another “evergreen”, trotted out whenever we get hot weather, to re-inforce the global warming meme:

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-planes-cant-fly-in-extreme-heat-2013-7?IR=T
http://www.cntraveler.com/stories/2016-06-20/its-so-hot-some-planes-cant-fly-heres-why
http://kjzz.org/content/158320/record-heat-grounded-planes-phoenix-25-years-ago-today

However, as usual there is more behind the headline:

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/06/did-climate-change-ground-flights-in-phoenix/530976/

American Airlines canceled flights using Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ) equipment. These are the business jets that cover routes between hubs and smaller markets. Larger passenger jets are rated to tolerate higher temperatures, well above those currently being experienced in the American Southwest—after all, planes also fly from Dubai, Riyadh, and Cairo.

The CRJ’s history might play a role in its airworthiness under extreme heat. CRJs are currently made by Bombardier, a multinational transportation manufacturer. Bombardier bought the CRJ line from Canadair, a Canadian state aerospace company. These jets were originally designed for business use, and only later developed to serve the commercial regional jet market.

They were not necessarily intended for use in all conditions and markets, nor to be packed full of passengers like they are today. (Bombardier did not immediately respond to a request for comment.)

That circumstance is a consequence of deregulation and consolidation in the American airline market. When regulation demanded that airlines serve all markets, larger jets serviced smaller airports. But as those requirements lifted, and as more airlines merged, even once-thriving hubs like Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Memphis have become minor markets.

Airlines began relying on equipment like the CRJ, because they can transport a smaller number of people at a lower cost. Were the affected flights on Boeing large jets instead, there would be no question about their ability to fly.”

The Daily Mail confirms this:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4618282/120-degree-temperatures-disrupt-flights-Phoenix.html

“The maximum operating temperature for each aircraft type is based on manufacturer data: Airbus – 127 degrees, Boeing – 126 degrees and Bombardier CRJ regional aircraft – 118 degrees, according to a statement from American Airlines obtained by DailyMail.com.”

Phoenix of course, is HOT. Record high for June is 1990, at 122 F, 50C.  It seems everything is really pretty normal, but hey, it’s Global Warming, right.

As usual, Tony Heller has the detail:
https://realclimatescience.com/2016/06/arizona-historic-heatwave-fraud/

 

Tags: , ,